Strata Conference East 2013: Data professionals confront privacy, access issues

In a podcast, SearchDataManagement's Jack Vaughan reports on data issues as discussed at Strata East 2013 in New York, and IBM IOD 2013 in Las Vegas.

Data professionals face an increasingly difficult juggling act when balancing data security and data access issues these days, adding more complexity to an already difficult job. Often, the data pros' mandate is to enable access while at the same time protecting privacy -- no easy task.

This and other modern data issues were discussed in a recent SearchDataManagement podcast. In the downloadable podcast, News Editor Jack Vaughan told SearchBusinessAnaltyics News Editor Ed Burns that data balance was a foremost topic at the Strata Conference/Hadoop World 2013 event he covered last month in New York.

Vaughan's report includes details on a session led by Micheline Casey, chief data officer at the Federal Reserve Board, who told Strata Conference attendees that they had to begin to think about the entire lifecycle of data sets as they deliver data-intensive applications. Data professionals need to be "much smarter about what is acceptable," said Casey, whose comments came in a season marked by high-profile data issues, the most marked being revelations of the National Security Agency's extensive covert data gathering under the aegis of the USA Patriot Acts of 2001 and 2006.

Also covered in the podcast is IBM's Information on Demand (IOD) 2013 event, held earlier this month in Las Vegas. There, data issues arising from big data implementation efforts were prominently discussed.

Data leaders from large enterprises on hand at IOD cautioned that, while they see value in emerging big data implementations that combine unstructured data with structured data sources, such implementations may need to be brought under general data governance to both ensure data privacy and achieve genuine business objectives.

In the nine-minute podcast, Vaughan further discussed the ethics and privacy of modern medical data-gathering devices. In a lighter moment, Burns and Vaughan wondered: If one is connected to such devices and his blood pressure goes up because of data privacy incursions, who owns that blood pressure data? Listeners will:

Jack Vaughan is SearchDataManagement's news and site editor. Email him at jvaughan@techtarget.com and follow us on Twitter: @sDataManagement.

This was first published in November 2013

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